• Spotlight

    Research tools that make your life easier

    I had some fun over at Real Scientists DE this week and wanted to use this opportunity to ask researchers, which tools they find the most useful to add to my list. GitHub |R Markdown |Unpaywall | Zotero | Overleaf | ORCiD | Google Scholar Alerts and Feedly | Preprint Servers/Repositories | Podcasts | Twitter 1. GitHub What it is: GitHub is “a web-based hosting service for version control using Git” (Wikipedia). An open source alternative would be GitLab (here’s a comparison of the two). Why it’s great for research: It increases research reproducibility and transparency, facilitates collaboration, enables you to get feedback early on (or whenever you’re ready for it). GitHub takes…

  • Spotlight

    PhD Application: Statement of Purpose

    It’s part of my daily ritual. My phone lights up, notifying me about the newest Google Scholar Alerts. I open the e-mail and scan through the latest published research articles in political science, and feel a rush of excitement as my curiosity is repeatedly sparked. Digesting article after article, my desire to do research and ask my own questions to better understand the world we live in grows stronger. This is why I want to pursue a doctoral degree at the Political Science department at the John-F.-Kennedy-Institute (JFKI) at Freie Universität Berlin. My primary research interests lie in media framing. In particular, I want to investigate partisan media’s framing of…

  • Spotlight

    When is science credible?

    *** This article was originally posted on the OpenAIRE Blog *** The overarching goal of science is to deepen our understanding about the world we live in, and then to use this understanding, for example, to address social or medical problems. However, in order to pursue those goals effectively and efficiently, the scientific findings we base our actions on have to be credible. But how can we assess the credibility of research? Is a going through peer review enough, or being published? What if the study made it into in a “high-ranking” journal? Is that enough to deem findings credible? At best these are proxy indicators, at worst entirely false…

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    The worst of both worlds: Hybrid Open Access

    *** This article was originally posted on the OpenAIRE Blog *** ** Thank you to Mikael Laakso for the excellent feedback ** A couple weeks ago, the European Commission (EC) announced that starting with their new funding programme, Horizon Europe, they will no longer reimburse publication fees for hybrid Open Access. Previously, the EC had excluded hybrid APCs when they first introduced Open Access funds during the FP7 (Post-Grant) Open Access Pilot, but later covered hybrid Open Access in the following funding programme, Horizon 2020 (2014-2020). Hybrid Open Access describes an publishing model where some articles are made openly available, against the payment of an Article Processing Charge (APC), while other…

  • Spotlight

    Open Science in Indonesia

    *** This article was originally posted on the OpenAIRE Blog *** *Terima kasih to Afrilya, Surya Dalimunthe, Sami Kandha Dipura, and Dasapta Erwin Irawan from the Open Science Team Indonesia for their valuble input for this post. Last month, the Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education  (IGDORE) hosted their first Open Science Meetup in Ubud, Indonesia. Despite being a small group of participants, many different nationalities, disciplines, and professions were represented. During the 5-day event, open science projects like Conscience, Curate Science, and the Open Science MOOC were presented, more general research-related topics like disclosing scientific misconduct were discussed, and Tim Sains Terbuka Indonesia (Open Science Team Indonesia) provided insight…