• Spotlight

    When is science credible?

    *** This article was originally posted on the OpenAIRE Blog *** The overarching goal of science is to deepen our understanding about the world we live in, and then to use this understanding, for example, to address social or medical problems. However, in order to pursue those goals effectively and efficiently, the scientific findings we base our actions on have to be credible. But how can we assess the credibility of research? Is a going through peer review enough, or being published? What if the study made it into in a “high-ranking” journal? Is that enough to deem findings credible? At best these are proxy indicators, at worst entirely false…

  • Spotlight

    The worst of both worlds: Hybrid Open Access

    *** This article was originally posted on the OpenAIRE Blog *** ** Thank you to Mikael Laakso for the excellent feedback ** A couple weeks ago, the European Commission (EC) announced that starting with their new funding programme, Horizon Europe, they will no longer reimburse publication fees for hybrid Open Access. Previously, the EC had excluded hybrid APCs when they first introduced Open Access funds during the FP7 (Post-Grant) Open Access Pilot, but later covered hybrid Open Access in the following funding programme, Horizon 2020 (2014-2020). Hybrid Open Access describes an publishing model where some articles are made openly available, against the payment of an Article Processing Charge (APC), while other…

  • Spotlight

    Open Science in Indonesia

    *** This article was originally posted on the OpenAIRE Blog *** *Terima kasih to Afrilya, Surya Dalimunthe, Sami Kandha Dipura, and Dasapta Erwin Irawan from the Open Science Team Indonesia for their valuble input for this post. Last month, the Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education  (IGDORE) hosted their first Open Science Meetup in Ubud, Indonesia. Despite being a small group of participants, many different nationalities, disciplines, and professions were represented. During the 5-day event, open science projects like Conscience, Curate Science, and the Open Science MOOC were presented, more general research-related topics like disclosing scientific misconduct were discussed, and Tim Sains Terbuka Indonesia (Open Science Team Indonesia) provided insight…

  • Super Helpful by Jonas Jacobsson
    Spotlight

    Media Cloud: Explorer

    Media Cloud,  jointly run by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Center for Civic Media at MIT, is an open source, open data platform offering a suite of tools for media analysis. Media Cloud is free to use and allows you to analyze media attention and influence for topics you care about, better understand how narratives and ideas spread, and explore media trends. There already is a comprehensive webinar out there, that introduces the platform in ~20mins, so I am not going to explain how to use the tools too much, but rather give you an example of what you can do with it.…

  • Spotlight

    Conference World Debut: Oh hi, anxie— err excitement!

    I just came back from my first *real* conference (one that was directly related to my work and passion), and it was incredible and overwhelming. I was super excited when I got invited to the Open Science Fair in Athens. First Open Science conference, first time in Greece, first poster presentation. Before I left for the conference a couple other firsts got added to that list: first conference talk and I landed my first job right before the conference. All of these things were a huge confidence boost and made me even more excited to go, yet feelings of excitement and anxiety lie really close together. So, my mind kind…

  • Aletheia
    Spotlight

    Aletheia for OSFair2017

    Aletheia: publish research for free, access research for free Aletheia is a decentralised and distributed database for publishing scientific research and datasets. The database itself is managed as a Decentralised Autonomous Organisation (DAO) run by users. Aletheia was inspired by the documentary covering Aaron Swartz’s struggle with paywalls in academic publishing, The Internet’s Own Boy. Academic paywalls are discriminatory to those who cannot pay for research and serve no purpose past making money for publishers as research is usually covered through funding from governments and other bodies. Couple this with the fact that the companies managing paywalls don’t add any significant value to the publishing process that couldn’t be added…

  • Spotlight

    My application to the Sage Bionetworks 2017 Assembly: Mapping Open Research Ecosystems

    Dear Sage Bionetworks, I am writing to express my great interest in your Assembly in Seattle this coming April. I recently finished my Master’s in North American Studies, which focused on politics and culture. My research has focused on how partisan groups communicate their messages, and what leads to either successful or failed communication. In that, I gained a deep understanding of how communities are established, what holds them together, and what causes disruption, which can lead to the formation of subgroups, or even new communities. For me, communities are an integral part to ecosystems. Within an ecosystem different groups, each with individual backgrounds, ideologies, and interest, come together and…

  • Spotlight

    Open Science-ing in Chiang Mai

    As some of you know, Jon and I are travelling through Southeast Asia at the moment. We always try to find things to do that lead away from the typical ‘tourist trail’, and let us connect with the local people and environment to experience Thailand (for now) on a deeper level. It is also very important for us to live our passions wherever we go, because only then can we fully be our authentic selves. Instead of doing the usual and just touring the temples of Chiang Mai, we wanted to make an impact here, and share our love for all things Open Science. Jon and I were lucky enough…